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Anonymous tip leads to drugs, gun arrest in Atlantic City

An anonymous tip to Atlantic City Police on Friday resulted in a drug investigation and the arrest of a 62-year-old man.

The anonymous tipster alerted police earlier in the day about narcotic activity near the 900 block of North Carolina Avenue. Police executed a search warrant there and found 468 bags of heroin, a handgun, a ballistic vest and $58,000 believed to be proceeds from narcotics trafficking.

Terrence Collier, 62, of Atlantic City, was charged with drug possession, possession with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a weapon, possession of a weapon during a drug offense, certain persons not to possess a weapon, obstruction of justice and resisting arrest.

Collier was taken to the Atlantic County jail.

Atlantic City Police urge the community and visitors to submit information using tip411 (847411). Begin the text with ACPD. Information can also be submitted by calling 609-347-5858.

Read the full story from the Press of Atlantic City

New ‘tip411’ app to let the public help Hamden police anonymously

A new smartphone app will let town residents be part of the police force, allowing allow anyone who downloads it to send anonymous tips and get alerts about crime in the community.

The Legislative Council this week approved funds for the police department to purchase the app.

“We know people are scared or intimidated,” Police Chief Thomas Wydra said. “This is the perfect tool to overcome that fear. It’s a way to encourage people to engage with us.”

The app, called tip411, lets a user submit crime tips anonymously, which alleviates a fear some have of getting involved with police. A user also can include photos or video.

Another feature allows the department to send out alerts to the community about crimes in the area. The alerts can be categorized by type of crime and can be directed at particular communities and neighborhoods. Through the app, a person with information can also add a tip to a specific alert.

“We want to connect with everybody, but certain groups are timid,” Wydra said. He said he is thinking specifically about schoolchildren and people with questionable immigration status who may have a heightened fear of interacting with police. “The app reaches them,” he said.

Read the full story in the New Haven Register

Police turning to technology to increase connection with people they serve

The Pelham Police Department is turning to an innovative new app to connect with people, and the department believes it’s the first in the area to use it.

“The app just takes our community policing to the next level,” said Sgt. Brian Barbato of the Pelham Police Department.

The Pelham PD app launched earlier this month. Designed by the Citizen Observer Program, it sends instant alerts to users on emergencies, road closures and press releases.

“People have loved it so far. We’ve got a lot of positive feedback from it. People love the interaction with the police department. They love to know what’s going on in their community,” said Barbato.

It also allows people to sends tips directly to the police dispatcher.

“And you can have a back and forth conversation with that dispatcher and then he or she can relay that information to the officers working the road,” said Barbato.

“These tips that can come in through the app are completely anonymous. We don’t have any IP addresses attached to it,” added Lt. Anne Perriello of Pelham police.

Watch or read the full report from WMUR9 TV

Protecting the environment through your cell phone

The Department of Land and Natural Resources has released an app that allows you to make anonymous reports and tips to them. The app also allows you to post photos and videos. Also, unlike DLNR’s old answering machine where tips were not always documented, the app that launched today, stores it’s history.

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Watch the report from KITV, Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather – KITV Channel 4

Education Matters: No room for bullying in schools

…An important part of responding to bullying is to know when it is happening. Teachers and administrators are trained in the ‘4 A Response’, through PBIS, how to Affirm a student giving a report, Ask the right questions, Assess the report or threat, and Act on the information appropriately.

Students are provided ways to report bullying, including telling a trusted adult, using a paper method in the front office, or by using the Tip411 text or email app. While all students are encouraged to talk candidly with counselors, teachers, administrators, coaches or other adults they trust, many opt for more anonymous methods like Tip411.

The app is offered in partnership with Napa and American Canyon police departments and the Napa County Sheriff, and allows students to anonymously report bullying, suicide threats, crimes or other situations to school administrators and law enforcement, who can move quickly to investigate any unsafe incidents.

And, of course, we encourage parents to be vigilant for signs of bullying or bullying behavior, and to report concerns to a teacher and principal…

Read the full post from the Napa Valley Unified School District in the Napa Valley Register

Barrera announces new ‘tip411’ smartphone app for anonymous messages to sheriff’s office

The Highland County Sheriff’s Office now allows the public to share important public safety information anonymously with law enforcement by sending them a secure text message about crimes or suspicious activity in Highland County via a free smartphone app.

The Highland County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release that it is launching “tip411,” an internet-based tool from Citizen Observer that enables the public to text message an anonymous tip to law enforcement and lets the officers respond back, creating an anonymous two-way conversation. The app can be downloaded for free via the Google Play store and iTunes App Store. Enter Highland County Sheriff in the search bar.

In addition, anyone with a cell phone may send an anonymous tip to the Highland County Sheriff’s office by texting HCSHERIFF and their message/tip to 847411 (tip411). Anonymous web tips can be submitted right from the sheriff’s office website at http://www.highlandcoso.com.

The Text Tips App and tip411 anonymous text-a-tip system are 100 percent anonymous, as the technology removes all identifying information before law enforcement officers see the tips and there is no way to identify the sender.

“We believe the public is our greatest law enforcement resource,” said sheriff Donnie Barrera, adding that “tip411 allows a safe and secure way for community members to share important information with law enforcement without the fear of retribution.”

Read more from The Times-Gazette

“Everyone is texting; no one wants to talk on the phone anymore.”

tip411 interviewed Assistant Chief Jim Speyer of the Cheektowaga, New York Police Department.  Here’s what he had to say about using tip411 in their community:

Q: Tell us about your community and the Cheektowaga Police Department (how many residents, how many sworn, etc.).
A:
We are a first ring suburb of the City of Buffalo with a major shopping mall that serves Western NY, Southern Ontario, Canada, and Northern Pennsylvania. It’s the hub of a huge retail area we have and brings in lots of traffic and visitors to our area. The Buffalo-Niagara Airport is located in our jurisdiction as well

There are about 87,000 people in the town of Cheektowaga, and the demographics are changing from predominantly Polish and German neighborhoods to African American neighborhoods in the area that borders the City of Buffalo.

Our department has 129 sworn officers and we’re big on community policing and getting out and knowing the public. Our goal is always to try to open doors between us and the community we serve.

Q: How did you hear about tip411?
A:
Our chief was attending an International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Conference several years ago and heard about it there.

After that, he brought it to Cheektowaga in 2012 and we’ve been using it for the last 5 years.

Q: How is tip411 administered in your department (responsibilities, protocols, etc.)?
A:
When we first implemented tip411 we had all the tips going to supervisors; sergeants, lieutenants, and captains. When they received a tip, each of them would designate if it needed to be forwarded to someone in particular for follow up.

We tried to stress to the community in the beginning that it was a tip line, not something that should be used for reporting in-progress crimes as it was not monitored 24/7.

However, the way society is today, it’s all about texting and we receive lots of calls for service through tip411 despite or efforts to communicate to people they should be calling 911.

Once we realized this was how people wanted to communicate, we set it up so that tips also go to our dispatch center. Supervisors still receive tips, but dispatches are also alerted to a tip so if it’s something that needs an immediate response they can dispatch units immediately.

Q: How has the tip411 system aided your department?
A:
tip411 aided our department by helping us receive some valid information and tips on drugs. Lots of tips we receive are narcotics-related or about suspicious activity that gets forwarded to our narcotics officers who can initiate an investigation on an address.

People have always been able to call in to our department and say that want to be anonymous and we’ll adhere to that, but people don’t trust that it’s truly anonymous if they can. So the value of tip411 is that people trust this system to truly keep them anonymous and they use it for that.

There are times we go back and forth via text message with the tipster to get more information and sometimes they end up volunteering their identity to help us get in touch with them to get even more actionable intel on a case.

Q: Any notable tips/arrests credited to tip411 that come to mind?
A:
Just a few months ago, we received a tip that 2 people were in a car smoking crack. Our officers would never have known about it, but a tip came in to our dispatchers and they dispatched units. Officers found crack cocaine and heroin and arrested both individuals in the car.

This is typical of our system. We get tips on suspicious people, suspicious cars, etc. The reality, we as police believe something like this should be called in, but if people aren’t comfortable, then they use tip411 and its better than us not getting this information at all.

Q: What have you done to promote your tip411 system to make sure residents know about it and use it?
A:
tip411 is promoted on our website and Facebook page. On Facebook we often post about individuals with outstanding warrants and ask people to share information with us via tip411.

When we first launched tip411, we rented billboards in the area and had a big display, which I think was great for getting in front of people and introducing the system. We also had our tip411 information stenciled on our police cruisers.

5 years later, we still hand out flyers with our tip information at community events and when I send out press releases to the media about certain incidents, I always include our tip411 information in there to ask residents to submit tips and help us fight crime.

Image_CheektowagaTip411_billboard

Q: Any advice for other departments considering tip411?
A:
I think it’s obvious that things change and even though it was not meant to be something for people to use to report crimes or incidents in progress, I feel it’s a necessity to have.

Around here, most departments have some form of an anonymous tip line, and to have this text option from tip411 is great. Everyone is texting; no one wants to talk on the phone anymore.

It’s a cultural thing. If people feel more comfortable texting – just like the case I mentioned where people were reported smoking crack – if people feel more comfortable texting than calling then that’s fine because we still got the information and got drugs off our streets.

Chief Anthony Holloway Calls tip411 “essential to modern policing”

Chief Anthony Holloway of the St. Petersburg, Florida Police Department is someone who has been a great partner with tip411, using the system as the head of three different departments.

Read below the letter below that Chief Holloway shared with his colleagues in the law enforcement community about his thoughts on the need for tip411 and how it is essential to modern policing:

“Dear Colleagues, 

As law enforcement leaders, we continue to look for ways to reach out, share information, and encourage our citizens to help us with our efforts to reduce crime and create safer communities.

I believe the tip411 system is essential to modern policing.  I’ve used this system during my time as chief in Somerville, Massachusetts, Clearwater, Florida, and now in St. Petersburg, and I truly believe this tool empowers officers and the community to engage and communicate in ways that were not possible before.

With that in mind, I’d like to introduce you to Terry Halsch, President of tip411.  I invite you to connect with him to learn more about how their anonymous text a tip service, community alerts sent directly to residents via email and text message, social media integration, and new, innovative, tip411 Mobile app for iPhone and Android can be deployed by your department.

Visit tip411.com to learn more about the solutions they offer and read about how departments large and small across the United States are utilizing the system to gather intelligence from residents, close cases, and reduce crime.

Sincerely, 

Anthony Holloway
Chief of Police

Holloway Tip411 Support letter 20170131